Are the grounds shown in the above case ethically justifiable

Business Ethics

 

Are the grounds shown in the above case ethically justifiable

 

Case Studies

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

 

Prohibition is good and women would appreciate a policy of prohibition. However some state governments may scrap prohibition on the grounds that (i) the adjoining states do not observe prohibition, hence people visit those states to quench their desire for the beverage (ii) the existence of illicit distillation and the difficulty in stopping this (iii) the strain on government resources for implementing prohibition, including the loss of revenue from excise duty.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Are the grounds shown in the above case ethically justifiable? Explain.

Q2. In your opinion what are the benefits of prohibition. Discuss.

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

In “The Buck Stops Here,” a presentation for the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics Roundtable for Executives, Michael Hackworth talked about how he models ethical leadership in his role as CEO of chip manufacturer Cirrus Logic. “Employees take their cue from the CEO,” he said. “In every situation, they ask, ‘What does the boss want?’ They give him what he wants when they talk about the business, when they talk about the law, and when they talkor don’t talk about ethics. In general, people line up behind what the CEO wants.” The Ethics Roundtable for Executives brings business leaders together to discuss the moral dilemmas they confront in the workplace. Using this case study, created with Center Executive Director Thomas Shanks, S.J., Hackworth encouraged members of the Roundtable to imagine how they might confront this challenge: Their company is planning to expand into a country where bribe taking is considered a normal part of doing business. Pegasus International Inc. is a leading manufacturer of integrated circuits (chips) and related software for such specialty markets as communications and mass storage, as well as PCbased

audio, video, and multimedia. With a focus on innovation, Pegasus is committed to “technology leadership in the new millennium.” Its longstanding strategy has been to anticipate changes in existing and emerging growth markets and to have hardware and software solutions ready before the market needs them. The company has also made significant strides in wireless communications. The systems and products of Pegasus’ wireless business have been selling well in its already existing markets in the United States, Japan, and Europe. But, like any company, Pegasus is eager to grow the business. At a strategy session with the Wireless Division, Pegasus CEO Tom Oswald and division managers decide to explore the potential of expanding their business to China. Initial research indicates that China is likely to develop into a huge market for wireless because its people do not currently have this capability and the government has made spending on wireless a priority. Wireless is really the only choice for China because of the high cost of burying the communications cables necessary in wired systems; further, in underdeveloped countries, copper wires are often stolen and sold on the black market. Subsequent research does raise one concern for Pegasus wireless managers. They tell Oswald, “We have this problem. China allocates frequencies and makes franchise decisions city by city, district by district. A ‘payoff’ is usually required to get licenses.” The CEO says, “A lot of companies are doing business with China right now. How do they get around the problem?” His managers have done their homework: “We believe most other companies contract with agents to represent them in the country and to get the licenses. What these contractors do is their own business, but apparently it works pretty well because the CEOs of all those companies are able to sign the disclosure statement required by law saying that they  know of no instance where they bribed for their business.” “I wonder if paying someone else to do the crime is the same as our doing the crime,” Oswald says. “I’m just not very comfortable with the whole question of payoffs. So, let me ask you, if we don’t expand into China, how much business will we lose, potentially?” His Wireless Division manager responds, “It will be huge not to do business in all the countries expecting payoffs. China alone represents easily $100 million of business per year. It’s not life and death, but it is a sizable incremental opportunity for us, not to mention potential Japanese partners who will make significant capital investments. All we have to do is add our already existing technology. When you consider all that, we have a lot to gain. What will we really lose if our local contractors are forced to make payoffs every now and then?” Oswald wants his company to succeed, he wants to maximize shareholder value, he wants to keep his job, and he wants to model ethical leadership. He has made an effort to build a corporate culture characterized not only by aggressive R&D and growth but also by integrity, honesty, teamwork, and respect for the individual As a result, the company enjoys an excellent reputation among its customers and suppliers, employee morale is high, and ethics is a priority at the company.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Give an overview of the case.

Q2. What should Pegasus CEO decide in this case? Why?

 

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

Thirty-two sadhus from Punchamahal district, who were on a 72hour relay hunger strike at Godhra since Friday to canvass against the BJP candidate from the Lok Sabha constituency there, Mr. Shankarisinh Vaghela, from his role in the toppling of the Keshubhai Patel ministry after spearheading a revolt, called off their agitation today, reports PTI. Reports received from Godhra, about 80kms from here, said the mahanta and sadhus, along with the vicepresident of all India ShadhuSant’s Samiti, Avichanddas Maharaj from Sarsa in Anand Constituency, withdrew the fast, which was to end at 2.00 p.m. tomorrow. It was not immediately clear as to why they called off the protest prematurely. The sadhus had said they wanted to ensure the defeat of Mr. Vaghela in the election and alleged that he had betrayed them by dethroning Mr. Patel last October. They also demanded an end to ‘Khajuraho Culture’ in the BJP and noted that Mr. Vaghela had flown dissident BJP MLAs to Khajuraho in Madhya Pradesh during the revolt by some rebels in the party. Meanwhile, the Chief Minister, Mr. Suresh Mehta, at a press conference at the Chhotaudepur town in Baroda district, appealed to the sadhus to end their program of dharna ‘in the interest of the BJP and the nation’

Answer the following question.

Q1. Give an overview of the above case

Q2. Explain the ethical aspects in the above case.

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

Lucy is a second semester senior at a small private university near San Francisco. Coming into college, Lucy had to choose between two similar universities on opposite sides of the country, one in California and the other in New York. Lucy’s decision came down to location and she ended up selecting the California university because of its proximity to her home and family. Now, Lucy is preparing for her postgraduate life. She has applied to countless jobs in public relations, as her father has always told her that getting a job is a numbers game. Several positions have been on the East Coast, but the majority has been in California. Lucy knows her mother would like her to stay close to home. Lucy has a younger brother still in high school whom she could mentor, and an older sister who lives at home and commutes to her job in the city. Lucy’s dream job is to work for a global public relations agency in a big city like New York or Chicago. She isn’t really interested in doing public relations for the technology industry. California agencies largely work in technology, so if she stayed close to home she would likely have to work tech for part of her career. That being said, family is the most important aspect of Lucy’s life. She was raised in a home where family is No. 1, and there were no compromises when it came to the family’s wellbeing. Everyone in her family looks out for one another. She would absolutely love to stay near them if she has the opportunity after college. After a long and hard job search, Lucy manages to get an internship at one of the largest global public relations agencies in Chicago. She also gets several good agency jobs in San Francisco, including one at a global public relations firm working in technology. Lucy is struggling with her decision. She knows that she doesn’t really want to work in technology, but she does want to stay close to home if possible. Both agency jobs pay around the same, and she would be able to grow in each company with hard work.  She also could jump location eventually should she desire to experience working in a different city.

Answer the following question.

Q1. What is more important, individual career goals or family responsibility and loyalty? Discuss.

Q2. Does Lucy have an ethical responsibility to consider family when preparing for her future career? Why or why

not?

Are the grounds shown in the above case ethically justifiable

 

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