Discuss the moral and ethical issues w.r.t the facts above.

 

Business Ethics

 

Discuss the moral and ethical issues w.r.t the facts above.

 

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

Dallas: For the last six months, many Roman Catholic priests have felt like the public face of scandal, in their communities, even though most had no role in the sex abuse crisis engulfing the church. Now, they say, they face a new concern: whether the blameless in their ranks will be hurt under the ambitious policy bishops have adopted to keep abusive clergy away from parishioners. Under the “Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People,” clergymen who molest children will never again be active in church work, and some will be formally removed from the priesthood. Many priests say they are concerned about the document’s board definition of abuse, and they question whether the church leaders who approved it have taken enough responsibility for their own roles in creating the moral emergency. “The policy is driven a lot more by public sentiment than the principle of compassion.” Said the Rev. Robert Silva, Head of the National Federation of priests’ Councils, which claims a membership of about half of the nation 46,000 priests. Since the scandal erupted in January with the conviction of a former Boston priest for molesting a boy, scores of people have come forward with accusations of sexual abuse by priests and indifference from church leaders. At least 250 priests have since resigned or been suspended. Silva said priests – already anxious about their interactions with children – we be even more apprehensive because of the definition of abuse the bishops approved on Friday. Abuse will now be considered as any inappropriate contact with a child, regardless of whether it involves force, physical contact or whether any harm is apparent. Silva called the wording “very frightening.” Philadelphia cardinal, Anthony Bevilacqua, who is a canon lawyer, said he too was concerned by the language and hoped it would be clarified when the document comes under review in two years. “It’s very difficult to come to a definition,” he said. “It must be something of a serious nature and involve some kind of bodily interaction.” Silva also complained that the plan contained severe punishments for the priests but no sanctions for bishops who mishandle abuse cases. The bishops have informed a national governor Frank Keating, to annually review whether church leaders are complying with the policy. Some clergy said that wasn’t enough. The bishops added a clause saying they “deeply regret that any of our decisions have obscured the good work of our priests.” But Mondignor Kenneth Lasch, a parish priest and canon lawyer in Paterson, New Jersey, Diocese felt the apology sounded stilted.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Give an overview of the above case.

Q2. Discuss the moral and ethical issues w.r.t the facts above.

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

Paula is a freshman at a large university in southern California. She is involved with a sorority, Alpha Alpha, on her campus. Paula rushed Alpha Alpha because she heard that it was heavily involved in philanthropy. In fact, Alpha Alpha hosts an annual philanthropy week donating money to a charity that raises money for cancer research. Paula is excited to take part in the weeklong activities because philanthropy and service have always been an important part of her life. She wants to find out more about the charity, and is thrilled that other college students will also be finding out more about cancer research and what they can individually do to help fight cancer. When the week approaches, Paula is surprised at the activities that will take place. She notices that not once in the week’s activities does it mention cancer research. Teams simply signup and have each member pay $15 to partake in the activities. Paula notices that the activities are simply attending a dinner at a local restaurant, performing a two minute dance on stage, a karaoke tournament, a fashion show, and a scavenger hunt. Paula thinks the week is a lame excuse of a philanthropic effort. She hears from her older sorority sisters that teams just pay the fee and never hear about the charity again. Teams allegedly just participate to get drunk and attempt to win the activities for bragging rights. Paula is disappointed to be a part of such a philanthropy week.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Are philanthropy weeks, like the one Paula’s sorority puts on, ethical? Give your comment.

Q2. Do participants actually get an idea where their money is going? Explain.

Q3. What about charity balls that older individuals take part in? Oftentimes individuals pay a large sum of money per plate at these charity events, but don’t learn much about the charity and just attend to boost their social status. Discuss.

Q4. Is there a difference between the way they are run and these college philanthropy weeks? Debate.

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

US researchers said on Monday they have created a new human embryonic stem cell by fusing an embryonic stem cell. They hope their method will provide a way to create tailor made treatments from scratch, using cloning technology. That would mean generating the valuable cells without using a human egg, and without creating a human embryo, which some people, including President George W. Bush, find objectionable. But the team, led by stem cell expert Douglas Melton, Kevin Eggan and others at Harvard Medical School, stress in a report to be published in next Friday’s issue of the journal Science that their method is not yet perfect. Stem cells are the body’s master cells, used to continually regenerate tissues, organs and blood. Those taken from days old embryos are considered the most versatile. They can produce any kind of tissue in the body. Doctors hope to use embryonic stem cells as a source of perfectly matched transplants to treat diseases such as cancer, Parkinson’s disease and some injuries. But because some people object to the destruction of or experimentation on a human embryo, US law restricts the use of federal funds for this kind of research. It is a hot debate in Congress and several bills have been offered for consideration that would either relax the federal restrictions or tighten them even more. Melton has complained about the restrains and, like other experts, has used private funding to pursue stem cell work. He and other experts say they only want to understand how to reprogram an ordinary cell and hope the use of human embryo would only be a short term and interim step to learning how to manufacture these cells. The Harvard team says they have taken a big step in this direction. Currently, embryonic stem cells are either taken from embryos left over from fertility clinics, or generated using a cloning technology called nuclear transfer. This requires taking the nucleus out of an egg cell and replacing it with the nucleus of an adult cell, called a somatic cell, f from the person to be treated. This reprograms the egg, which starts dividing as if it had been fertilized by a sperm.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Give an overview of the above case

Q2. What is cloning technology? Explain.

Q3. Explain the unethical aspects of cloning.

Q4. Discuss necessity and ethical aspects of cloning.

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

Frank and Bobby are freshmen at a university on the semester system. They meet at orientation and bond over their major, Economics, and their hobby of playing sports. They decide to request one another as roommates, and both enroll in the same mathematics class: calculus for business majors. The two get off to a bad start academically. They are experiencing the freedom of living on their own for the first time. No parents are around to make sure they are keeping up with their homework assignments or readings. In fact, since Frank and Bobby are both in the same math class, they often take turns going to class. It starts off with the boys alternating going to class, but eventually turns into both boys often skipping. One evening, midway through the semester, Frank and Bobby run into a classmate who informs them they have a midterm the next morning. They successfully get her class notes, however they soon realize they don’t have enough time to study unless they pull an all-nighter. Bobby doesn’t believe he can stay up all night and still perform well on the test the next morning. He decides that it’s in his best interest to create a cheat sheet and plug equations into his calculator. He Frank is against cheating. He calls out Bobby, saying that this is unethical. Instead, he buys two Adderall pills from a student in their dorm who has ADD. He has heard that taking Adderall helps you stay awake and focus. Bobby gets upset when he finds out Frank is taking Adderall to study. Bobby claims that there is no difference between taking a drug that isn’t prescribed to you to help you study and bringing in a cheat sheet. Bobby says they are both forms of cheating. Frank disagrees, claiming that at least he’s going through the process of studying for the midterm.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Do you believe it’s cheating to take an academic performance enhancing drug that isn’t prescribed to you? Comment.

Q2. Is relying on academic performance enhancing drugs to study dangerous in long term? Explain.

Discuss the moral and ethical issues w.r.t the facts above.

 

Assignment Solutions, Case study Answer sheets

Project Report and Thesis – Contact

aravind.banakar@gmail.com

www.mbacasestudyanswers.com

ARAVIND – 09901366442 – 09902787224

 

 

Share Button