A high level US executive from New York, who was being groomed

Business Communication

 

A high level US executive from New York, who was being groomed

 

Case Studies

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

A high level US executive from New York, who was being groomed to be the next CEO in a Japanese company, had a very strong New York accent. Usually, we only work with international executives, but because they needed results fast and I knew the hiring manager, we agreed to work with him. Problem: Due to his heavy accent he was perceived as less educated here in California, even though he was very smart and had an MS degree from Cornell University. To make matters worse, he worked for an Asian company whose executives came to hear his “state of the company” speech twice a year, and they always had to pay special attention when he spoke.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Give solution of the above problem

Q2. Give an overview of the case.

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

The pilot group’s readership of messages was measured in two ways: • Metrics provided in the Snap Comms reporting tool for IQ Now (scrolling ticker) • The completion rate of the staff quiz that was sent as a follow up to IQ Direct. For the control group the only way readership of the email messages could be measured was to track email open rates; the drawback of this was that it could not be established whether employees has actually read the messages or merely opened the emails. The readership rate for SnapComms was taken within four hours of the desktop ticker message being delivered. The difference between the pilot and control groups was dramatic — the lowest readership rate of IQ Now was measured at 93%, compared to 22% for email. The analytics also showed that the SnapComms messages were also read closer to the start of employees’ shifts. “The information I get in the IQ Now is timely and relevant for my skill set and I like having the urgent messages scroll at the bottom of my screen” Pilot group employee. (Employee bulletin) demonstrated that the allocation of 15 minutes additional reading time was a significant driver of message readership. Where that time away from the phones was provided, readership was at levels in the range of 8092% for SnapComms and 6175%

for email, using the same templates. When the time away from the phones was not given, readership for SnapComms dropped to a range of 3055%,

while for email it was 4651%. “SnapComms really gives me lots of useful and updated information which helps in my daily job. Excellent tool” Pilot group employee.

Answer the following question.

Q1. How the readership of messages was provided by SnapComms? Explain.

Q2. Give an overview of the case,

 

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

 

Several years ago, Brittany Brown completed a major undertaking. As a young, ambitious public affairs professional, she took it upon herself in 2008 to learn how to develop a strategic communications plan for her employer, the Norfolk, Va., district of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. “It was all on the job training , ” says Brown, now 29. “I was learning as I was going.” Though happy with the results, Brown knew she needed further instruction to take her business writing skills to the next level. So she enrolled in a strategic communications class in 2010 at Georgetown University’s Center for Continuing and Professional Education (2026877000).  “That course really solidified some of the things I had learned and helped to strengthen my skills, ” she says. “And it impacted my career in a positive manner for sure.” She now works on the marketing, branding and communications team at NPR, and she’s back at Georgetown teaching writing for social media. In today’s era of hash tag heavy tweets, abbreviation filled texts and quickly dashed off emails, you might not think it matters if your written communications have lots of typos and no punctuation. But in the business world, good writing still counts. The way you come across on paper or on the computer screen can impact everything

from landing a job to securing a promotion. “We all make assumptions, ” says Anna Mauldin, product manager in the leadership and development division at Management Concepts (8885458577), which offers courses on business writing, grammar and other topics at its downtown D.C. and Tysons Corner locations. “Poor writing could lead people to believe that you don’t have attention to detail or to question your competence or ability to do a job.” It can also hold you back in your career. “You can make it to a certain level without having great communication skills , ” says David Lipscomb, interim director of Georgetown’s Writing Center and assistant professor of teaching at Georgetown, who taught the course Brown took. “But you certainly cannot make it to top management without being a good communicator.” If you get tripped up by things like using the passive voice or organizing your ideas, there are lots of writing courses out there that can help. They range from daylong sessions to longer certificate programs offered via open enrollment. You can also find custom classes for specific workplaces. (See sidebar for some examples.) In them, students might cover how to use a comma, how to structure a report or how to write concisely.

Answer the following question.

Q1. How the Business communication, report writing skills can be enhanced? Give your comments.

Q2. Give an overview of the case.

CASE STUDY (20 Marks)

 

This is written for an English speaking audience who are taken to have a different (probably “Western”) culture and ways of communicating than here in China. It covers what sort of communication can be expected in China, what tensions and misunderstandings may arise, and how to respond. Being an obviously (Caucasian in particular) non Chinese on the streets of China requires a lot of patience and tolerance, or else one may soon feel angry with and a distaste for the Chinese. Tolerance is one of the

great virtues of the Chinese people, which allow so many people to live their lives in close proximity with a relatively low level of stress. The frequent shouts of “hello” may seem to be a friendly gesture at first, but soon can become irksome. In the majority of cases the shout of “hello” has no purpose other than to try out the single word of familiar English that the unthinking shouter has, and to see what reaction the foreigner has. Some Chinese, being very friendly in nature, cannot resist the urge to try to communicate with a non Chinese. Unfortunately their attempts can often come across as illtimed and rather obnoxious. Often shouts come from behind or way off to the side, are poorly pronounced and accompanied by giggles or a grin. Sometimes the shouts of “hello” are from someone who wants to sell something or someone who wants to warn of a danger or let you know you’ve dropped something, and this is the only way they know to get the “foreigner’s” attention. “Hello” – the response Usually the best way to respond to the multiple random greetings is a friendly “hello” or ignoring them completely if it is obviously someone trying to sell something you don’t want. Don’t say “nihao” unless you want to start a conversation in Chinese or you want a (often not well considered) comment about how good your Chinese is. If you use your Chinese, ignore the almost routine comments about how good your language skills are. They are seldom a good indication of your linguistic correctness, but just an encouragement to keep studying and a mark of appreciation for trying to learn Chinese. These comments often follow a mistake, so ignore the apparent insincerity. Helpful criticism and correction are seldom given as it is seen as impolite and may make you lose face. In fact, when you are understood and there is an absence of such comments, then you have probably achieved the required level, and are starting to be treated like a Chinese speaker, instead of a foreign student. We have produced a guide to the Chinese language with a number of useful phrases.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Discuss the reasons for a relatively low level of stress in China.

Q2. Give your views on the case.

 

A high level US executive from New York, who was being groomed

 

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