Analyse the nature of the kidswear market in India

 

Marketing Management

 

Analyse the nature of the kidswear market in India and understand the critical

 

Case Studies

Case Study (20 Marks)

Since foraying into the Indian textiles scenario in 1988, Madura Garments, a division of Madura Coats till 1999, has been catering to the varied apparel needs of men, with brands like Louis Philippe, Van Heusen, Allen Solly and Peter England. Even after the reins of Madura Garments were passed on to Indian Rayon (a subsidiary of the Aditya Birla Group) the company continued to offer a wide array of formal and informal men’s apparel. However, in spite of being a stable and dominant player in the men’s apparel segment, in 2001, Madura Garments ventured into women’s wear by extending its brands – Allen Solly and later Van Heusen. What was Madura Garments’ rationale and how did it affect the company? The case can be used to explore the same. After 7 years in 2008, Madura Garments implemented a similar strategy to enter the kidswear segment. Madura Garments is aiming to emerge as a specialty retail outlet, catering to the apparel needs of the entire family under one large roof. Its entry into the lucrative kidswear territory has been marked by a restrained advertising approach. However, can Madura Garments garner critical mass in a market that is dominated by unorganized players and homegrown brands like Gini & Jony and Lilliput, which boast of a strong national presence? Can it face competitors like Raymond that has marked its entry with an exclusive brand (Zapp!)? The case delves into the challenges that Madura Garments would face in the dynamic kidswear industry and questions its product mix and positioning strategies.

Answer the following question.

Q1. Analyse the nature of the kidswear market in India and understand the critical success factors in this industry

Case Study (20 Marks)

PepsiCo a world leader in convenient snacks, foods, and beverages is a $35 billion company. Some of the popular brands like PepsiCola, Mountain Dew, Diet Pepsi, Lays, Doritos, Tropicana, Gatorade, and Quaker Oats are owned by the company. The company saw a change of preference in it’s consumers in the 1990’s apart from this the beverage industry also observed a rise in functional drinks in the mid 2000s. The case focuses on the Pepsi’s strategy to address this change in the consumer behavior

Answer the following question.

Q1. Describe the Impact of changing consumer behavior on the food and beverage Industry.

Q2. Discuss the possible solutions to address the .change in consumer preferences.

Case Study (20 Marks)

Till the dawn of the 21st century, lamp makers concentrated on the quantity of light, and the growth has been from incandescent to fluorescent, to high and low pressure gas discharge, to compact fluorescent lamps, etc. The main aim of lamp makers has been to maximize the use of energy, focusing on not cutting the lighting levels. Prakash lamps ltd (PRL) plans to introduce electronic ballast with a view to minimize energy loss in conventional fluorescent lighting. In conventional lighting, a ballast and a starter are essential for starting and running fluorescent lamps. The electronic ballast virtually eliminates this loss. Whereas the normal blast consumes 12 watts of power in the case of the electronic blast, it is as low as 2 to 3 watts. The lamp’s efficiency goes up by 7 to 8 per cent. The life of the tube goes up by 2000 to 3000 hours. There is also no need for a flicker star. PRL estimates a resultant saving of at least Rs.400 during the life of the tube. In addition, the electronic ballast is particularly useful in areas facing frequent fluctuations of voltage. The organized sector accounts for 75 million fluorescent lamp production. Industry sources estimate that, in the next 5 years, about 30 to 40 per cent of the lamps will have electronic ballast. A potential threat however is offered by the advent of compact fluorescent tubes. Nevertheless, PRL feels the compact tube’s high installation cost is a plus point for the electronic ballast fitted fluorescent tube, which will only entail an additional cost of Rs.200

Answer the following question.

Q1. What marketing information will PRL need to decide whether the consumer will opt for the new product?

Q2. What should be the appropriate research technique that should be adapted to the required information? Explain

Case Study (20 Marks)

Since the early 1980’s, the dominant force in the sellercustomer relationship has shifted. Sellers no longer have the upper hand; customers do. Customers now tell suppliers what they want, when they want it, how they want it, and what they will pay. This situation is unsettling to companies that have known life only in the mass market. In reality, a mass market never existed, but for most of the twentieth century the idea of the mass market provided manufactures and service providers with the useful fiction that their customers were more or less alike. Now that they have choices, though, customers no longer behave as if they are all cast in the same mould Customers consumers and corporations alike demandproducts and services designed for their unique and particular needs. There is no longer any such notion as ‘the’ customer ; There is only ‘this’ customer, the one with whom a seller is dealing at the moment and who now has the capacity to indulge in his or her own personal tastes. The mass market has broken into pieces, some as small as a single customer. People do not like hardsell tactics, but they will tolerate them to acquire something they really want. If what they purchase turns out to be not quite what they wanted, their dissatisfaction with the product is magnified by theirdissatisfaction with the sales tactics. The basic problem (in years gone by) was that the focus of the marketing function of mass producers was not on marketing it

was on selling, on ‘pushing product’. Selling is a necessary part of the marketing function, but marketing is so much more, as management guru Peter Drucker observes: “There will always, one can assume, be need for some selling. But the aim of marketing is to make selling superfluous. The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product or service fits him and sells itself. Ideally, marketing should result in a customer who is ready to buy. All that should be needed then is to make the product or service available”.

Answer the following question.

Q1. 1. Market segmentation is based on the proposition that customers can be categorized according to their typical wants, needs and expectations. What is the future of segmentation, given the views of Hammer and Champy?

 

Analyse the nature of the kidswear market in India and understand the critical

 

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